Madison Food Policy Council Launches 2018 SEED Grants Application

Potential applicants from the Madison community gathered at Meadowridge Library last Wednesday for an information session discussing the 2018 SEED grant application. For the fifth year, the Madison Food Policy Council will distribute $50,000 in grant funds to support projects that increase healthy food access for City of Madison residents. Proposals from organizations, groups or agencies devoted to improving the local food system will be considered, and the maximum of any one grant will be limited to $10,000. “Over the past four years this grant has been funded, there have been 39 grants funded with $200,000 total,” Food Policy Coordinator George Reistad said. The information session was well-attended, garnering nearly a dozen potential applicants from organizations like Community Groundworks, Independent Living, Inc., East Madison Community Center and Slow Food UW.

Going beyond the plate with Madison food tours

 

Diving into the Great Dane Pub & Brewing Company’s Brat and Pretzel Burger felt like sinking teeth into a Wisconsin culinary history lesson. A juicy beef patty is topped with a savory bratwurst burger, smoked bacon and stout-caramelized onions. The pretzel bun was oozing with a luxurious layer of Wisconsin’s famed sharp cheddar, exuding a perfume of fragrant comfort. The burger tasted like a culinary representation of the state. Even the restaurant’s brick laden home was ensconced in a rich backstory: the Great Dane is nestled in the old Fess Hotel, a building on the National Register of Historic Places and a designated Madison landmark.

Wisconsin-made gift ideas for the holidays

Still looking for the right gift for your loved ones? Traveling over the holidays? Possibly leaving Wisconsin? Look no further. Here are ten amazing gifts ideas made in Wisconsin.

Media Digest November 1, 2017

Our weekly round up of headlines around Madison

Top Story

After the Roman Catholic bishop overseeing the Madison area last week issued guidance that suggested some gay people could be denied funeral rites, the community is circulating a national-attention-getting petition to have the bishop removed. Education

Wisconsin has the largest racial disparity in well-being between white children and black children. The future of school resource offers in Madison schools is being discussed halfway through the pilot program. Two Sun Prairie teachers established a scholarship fund for students to pursue engineering education, and they named the first recipient. Development

Grants will ensure the completion of a Madison College campus expansion by 2019.

Willy Street Co-op aims to help small vendors with monthly program

Willy Street Co-op launched a program in September to help small businesses market and improve their products. The Retail Ready Lab program debuted during the co-op’s Eat Local Month promotion. The program provides support from the co-op and customer feedback on products for local vendors for one month. General Merchandise Category Manager Angela Pohlman said in a press release that the program was inspired by vendors’ interest to appear on the co-op’s shelves but whose products or packaging needed further development. Throughout the month, staff at Willy Street meets with the vendors, gives them space in stores to advertise and hand out product samples to customers, and features them in the business’s magazine and social media.

Pops program breaks down mental illness stigma and promotes job experience

For a six-month season, Chrysalis Pops employees sell popsicles out of the Icicle Tricycle—a tricycle cooler—at local farmer’s markets and community events alongside the program’s slogan: “Pops with a purpose.”
Chrysalis Pops is a project from Chrysalis, Inc., a nonprofit organization that supports employment for individuals dealing with mental health struggles. Chrysalis Pops takes the organization’s mission one step further by actually offering employment opportunities, providing competitive wages and teaching employees crucial career skills. At the core of the Chrysalis Pops program is its mission to weaken the stigma around mental illness. Pops is a vehicle for integrating individuals with mental illnesses into the community’s workforce, lessening the stigma by putting a face to mental health struggles.  The “Pops with a purpose” slogan often prompts a conversation, Chrysalis Executive Director Dani Rischall said.