Media Digest February 6, 2018

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The county is looking to keep the population of incarcerated people low. Education

Students and employees of Madison College have reported an increased number of sexual harassment cases. School children completed 10,000 acts of kindness this week. East High students will talk about human rights in week of activities. Development

University Research Park is growing and adding more service spaces.

Media Digest January 30, 2018

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Dane County’s two forensic pathologists haven’t had a vacation day in a year, but they say the need for their services is reflective of the need for increased death investigator standards. Education

At Monona Grove High School, there’s a debate about whether “To Kill a Mocking Bird” should be included in the curriculum. Students with special needs are given an opportunity to shine on the stage with The Penguin Project in Sun Prairie. Madison schools superintendent Jennifer Cheatham is looking back on what she accomplished in her first five years. Development

After the abrupt closure of Sam’s Club earlier this month, the CEO of Dane County Boys and Girls Club is advocatingit be turned into a sports facility.

Madison grant program aims to increase community engagement, improve neighborhoods

The City of Madison’s Neighborhood Grant Program, which awards a total of $25,000 to neighborhood projects every year, is currently accepting applications through Feb. 19. Grant money will be awarded to small groups of neighborhood volunteers, neighborhood associations or business organizations that are involved with community building or civic engagement. The program supports projects that seek to build community engagement and improve its neighborhoods. “Strong and healthy neighborhoods make a strong and healthy city,” Linda Horvath from the City Planning Division said.

Public listening project aims to center public vision for Madison’s future growth

Every 10 years, the City of Madison is required to update its comprehensive plan, which is essentially a mission statement detailing the city’s plans and priorities for growth. To make this revision process more accessible to the public, the city created a public-listening project titled Imagine Madison. 
Since the fall of 2016, Imagine Madison has gathered residents’ opinions through a variety of in-person events and an online survey. Imagine Madison’s mission is to gauge the public’s visions, opinions and priorities for Madison’s growth. “Sometimes it’s easy to get bogged down in daily concerns, but we’re looking at the things we need to consider looking out 10 or 20 years down the line. We’re looking to the horizon, and not just looking at what’s in front of us,” Brian Grady of the City Planning Division said.

The Bus Stops Here: For a Participatory Democracy

 

One of the many examples of the disconnect between public transportation and land use in Madison that has been disenfranchising transit-dependent people for years is the impending relocation of the state’s Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) Service Centers on the west side. The new location will make it more accessible to car travel but less accessible to bus travel. One must go to a DMV Service Center to obtain the photo ID card now necessary for both voting in Wisconsin and receiving many federal services (i.e. a “Real ID,” passports can also be used at federal agencies, but are more expensive). Governmental and non-governmental organizations have for decades been relocating offices from oftentimes cramped quarters downtown to more spacious accommodations in car-centric and sprawly fringe areas of Madison. The Madison Area’s own Transportation Planning Board (MPO) moved its meetings from downtown to a location with limited transit access some years ago.

Media Digest December 19th 2017

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A deep look at the Proud Boys chapter in Madison revisits one night of violence. Education

A workshop aims to teach parents of students STEM skills. The Goddard School for early-childhood learning tests educational toys. The group 100 Black Men of Madison is bringing the holiday spirit to high school students who are caregivers for younger siblings. Development

Promega, a  biotech company, shareholders are in a legal dispute alleging racketeering.

Media Digest November 27, 2017

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Your MGE bill is likely to go up after a rate increase. Education

A handful of elementary and middle schools in the Madison district are piloting a project to let students make creative products. Development

A low-cost Internet program for low-income neighborhoods is in peril. The site of a mixed-use development on Williamson Street is now the site of numerous complaints.  A committee recommends investment in neighborhood employment programs.

Community

A Madison Resident recalls what it was like to watch a hydrogen bomb explode in the 1960s while in the military.

Media Digest November 17, 2017

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The final city budget is out, and it comes with changes to police staffing, police body cameras, and the public market. Education

Hate and bias incidents are increasing in schools. A Waunakee class is fostering a love of nature and conservation. It’s Sunday school…. On Saturday… for students at one Madison synagogue.

Cap Times Talk discusses the role of diversity and inclusion in building strong neighborhoods

City planners and community members met in an open forum at the High Noon Saloon last Tuesday to discuss how to build healthy neighborhoods in Madison. The forum was the latest in the Cap Times Talks discussion series, a two-year-old program hosting open discussions of community issues, diversity and development in Madison. The five-person panel represented backgrounds from city planning to urban, community-focused architecture, and took questions both from moderator Abigail Becker as well as audience members. Over the course of the hour-long discussion, the panel identified several key factors in developing healthy neighborhoods, including accessible community centers, design beyond a neighborhood level and utilizing diverse viewpoints to develop plans for the future. Panelist Heather Stouder, director of Madison's Planning Division, acknowledged past mistakes of city planning, and stressed the importance of creating neighborhoods that provide options in housing, recreation and transportation to their residents.