When you’re not ‘safer at home’: How city, state services are supporting domestic abuse victims during quarantine

Data suggests domestic abuse is proliferating around the world in conditions created by the coronavirus pandemic.

Officials in Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles and Seattle have publicly stated they are seeing increases in domestic violence allegations. Shannon Barry, Executive Director of Domestic Abuse Intervention Services, anticipates the same for Madison.

Marsy’s Law passed in the Spring Primary, but what does it actually mean?

The Marsy's Law amendment was supported by an overwhelming majority in this month's election, passing with 75 percent of the vote. While the amendment appeals to common common sense  on the surface, opponents like the ACLU of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Justice Initiative (WJI), say the wording of the amendment is misleading. 

Chapman concerned for family, community and country during COVID-19 crisis

Kathleen Chapman admitted she is bored under the current stay-at-home order, but she also recognizes the struggles faced by millions of others around the country -- especially people of color and those in single- income households.

“I live in a position of enormous amounts of privilege. My husband's job is secure. My job is secure. Heck, even my daughter's job is secure,” Chapman said. “We are not in a position to worry about whether or not we're going to make our mortgage payments or any of that. My concern is for the people who are going to be more disproportionately affected, and that's going to be people who have always been more vulnerable in our society.”

Hollandale’s Kirsch sticking with Trump despite turmoil

Rhonda Kirsch and her husband and son care for 500 cows on a dairy farm in Hollandale, Wisconsin. Kirsch has been a Trump supporter from day one, voting for him in the Republican Primary in 2016.

She intends to vote for him again this November. 

 “I like Trump for the business,” said Kirsch. “He had a lot to clean up. I don’t know why anyone would want to be president.”

Amid post-election frustration, Chapman trying to make best of quarantine

Editor's note: This story is the third in Madison Commons' series of profiles focused on the current climate of economic uncertainty and the 2020 election cycle. Long-standing voter Kathleen Chapman is left with frustration and anger after not being able to cast her vote this primary election. As an immunocompromised individual, she has been isolated in her home for more than 30 days. Compromising her health by going to the polls was not a risk she was willing to take. Out of the 11 states holding an April primary, Wisconsin was the only state to hold an in-person election and not postpone.

Finding political identity: How the pandemic changed one UW-Madison student’s primary vote

Dylan Witte can count on one hand the number of times they've brought up politics to their parents. In fact, it was only once, in fourth grade, when they were learning about then-presidential candidate Barack Obama. 

Their father's response was, "Excuse me, what?"

Witte — a nonbinary, queer-identifying UW-Madison junior (who uses they/them pronouns) — thought that was a normal reply. That is until they came to study in the state's politically diverse capital.

The Bus Stops Here: Public Transit and Dane County Board Elections

In the Spring of even-numbered years, Dane County elects Supervisors for two years. All 37 of them. Does that matter for public transportation? Not so far, but things could and should change. Almost half the seats on the County Board will be occupied by someone new.